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by Chris Bertram on December 16, 2018

Bristol, cobbles

{ 6 comments }

1

Mike Huben 12.16.18 at 12:37 pm

I hate to nitpick, but I’d call those pavers because they are not naturally rounded.

a naturally rounded stone, larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder, formerly used in paving.

Gorgeous picture.

2

Alan White 12.16.18 at 3:24 pm

There is great beauty in the ordinary–and wow does this find it!

3

Donald A. Coffin 12.17.18 at 12:12 am

I like this a lot. My version of something sort of similar was shot outside the Colosseum in 2002.
แจกเครดิตฟรี ล่าสุดhttps://wordsmusic-doc.blogspot.com/2018/12/yey-another-return-of-copycat.html

4

Collin Street 12.17.18 at 12:04 pm

I hate to nitpick, but I’d call those pavers because they are not naturally rounded.

“Setts”, traditionally used by rioters as improvised weapons.

[Which they could do because they were basically just bedded in clay: portland cement hadn’t been invented and nobody had thought of using tar [too expensive before the development of coal gas?]. No suitable adhesive for road-paving purposes… which is why they used setts in the first place. Technology is everywhere.]

5

William S Berry 12.17.18 at 4:28 pm

Those paving blocks remind me of the ones you see in green spaces in Latin American cities, except they are more-or-less mirror images. The LA ones have grass growing in square openings in the block instead of in the gaps between them.

6

Mike Huben 12.19.18 at 11:31 am

Thanks, Collin @4. I should have guessed there was some other old-time name for them. Obscure vocabulary is a favorite thing for me. And I love the detail of being embedded in clay!

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